AH2914 Physical Geodesy, 7.5c

Spring semester 2011


Physical geodesy concerns studies of the gravity field of the earth and in particular the geoid which serves as a reference surface for height determination. Precise information on the geoid is needed to transform GPS-determined ellipsoidal heights into heights above the mean sea level (the geoid). Knowledge on the earth's gravity field is also important for accurate
determination of satellite orbits.

As a natural science, physical geodesy is directly associated with studies of the whole earth system including the solid earth, the oceans and the atmosphere. For instance, precise geoid information can be used to model global ocean circulations so that one can better understand the process and mechanism of global climate change as a part of the general global changes.

This course in physical geodesy consists of 9 lectures and 8 practical exercises (including one field exercise on gravity measurements). Course participants are assumed to know basic surveying techniques and be familiar with at least one programming language (e.g. C++, Java, Matlab, Pascal or Fortran).

A complete description of the course's aim, contents, requirements, etc, can be found at KTH:s online Study handbook.


1.  Course Literature

Required literature:

Fan, H. (2010).
Theoretical Geodesy. KTH
Fan, H. (2010). Exercise Problems in Physical Geodesy. KTH.

Other optional literature:

Heiskanen and Moritz. (1967). Physical Geodesy.
Moritz. (1980). Advanced Physical Geodesy.
Sj÷berg (2003) A general model of modifying Stokes’s formula and its least squares solution. J Geod 77:459-464.

2.  Requirements

To pass the course, students must pass one written examination (TEN1: 4,5c) and complete all  exercises  (LAB1: 3c). If interested, students may check old exam questions from 2006 and 2007.


3.  Time Schedule
( L = lecture,  = exercise, TEN = Written exam)  

L

E

Date

Day

Time

Room

Topics

Chapters

L1

 

110321

 Mon

13-15 

L31

Introduction. Gravity field and gravity measurements

3.2.1, 3.2.2

 

E1

110325

Fri 

13-17

L31

Gravity measurements

3.2.1, 3.2.2

L2

 

 110328

Mon 

10-12

L31

Gravitation fields of simple mass distributions

3.1.1

 

E2

 

 

13-17

GEO

Gravitation fields of simple mass distributions

3.1.1

L3

 

110404

 Mon

09-12

L31

Laplace's equation and spherical harmonics

3.1.4, 3.1.5

 

E3

 

 

13-17

GEO 

Numerical computation of Legendre functions

3.1.4, 3.1.5

L4

 

110408

 Fri

10-12

L31

Normal gravity field and anomalous gravity field

3.2.3,3.2.5

 

E4

 

 

13-17

GEO

Gravity field, normal field and anomalous field

3.2.3,3.2.5

L5

 

 110426

Tues

10-12

L44

Global gravity field in harmonic expansions

3.3

 

E5

110429

 Fri

13-17

GEO 

Geoid computation using a global gravitational model

3.3 *

L6

 

110502

Mon 

15-17

  L31

Poisson's integral, Stokes' and Vening Meinesz' formula.

3.4

 

E6

 110503

  Tue

09-12

  GEO

Geoid computation using Stokes' formula

3.4

L7

 

110505

Thur

10-12

L31

Gravity reduction

3.4.7

 

E7

 

 

13-16

GEO

Gravity reduction. Computation of terrain corrections

3.4.7

L8

 

110512

Thur

10-12

L31

Truncation errors of Stokes' formula

3.4.6, 3.5.4

 

E8

 

 

13-16

  GEO

Computation of truncation errors. 
Geoid computation using a combination method

3.4.6, 3.5.4

L9

110518 Wedn 08-10 L31 KTH's modification method. Additive corrections.

L10

 

110519 

Thur 

10-12

L31

Molodenskii's theory. Bjerhammar's method. Collocation

3.5.1-3

TEN1

 

110527

Fri 

09-13

M31

Written examination

3

TEN1

 

august

 2011

 

 

Re-examination

3


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Last updated by Huaan Fan 2011-03-22.